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Full text of "College of Veterinary Medicine .."

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IZvG 
1953/6 



OLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 




UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 



u 



NIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 




UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 
BULLETIN 

Volume 56, 
Number 75; 
June, 

1959. Published 
seven times 
each month by 
the University 
of Illinois. 
Entered as 
second-class 
matter December 
11, 1912, at the 
post office at 
Urbana, Illinois, 
under the Act 
of August 24, 
1912. Office of 
Publication, 49 
Administration 
Building (West), 
Urbana, Illinois. 



1959-1961 



COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 



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\/ vo 






CONTENTS 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 5 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 5 

FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 6 

CALENDAR 8 

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 11 

OBJECTIVES 12 

FACILITIES 13 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 14 

THE CURRICULUM 15 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 18 

GRADUATE STUDY 18 

GRADING SYSTEM 18 

TUITION AND FEES 19 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 19 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 20 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 20 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 20 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 21 

ORGANIZATIONS 21 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 22 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR VETERINARIANS 22 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/collegeofveteri5961univ 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



MEMBERS EX OFFICIO 

William G. Stratton, Governor of Illinois Springfield 

Georgi T. Wilkins, Superintendent of Public Instruction .... Springfield 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

Term 1955-1961 

Wirt Herrick 118 Warner Court, Clinton 

Mrs. Frances B. Watkins 5454 Cornell Avenue, Chicago 15 

Kinney E. Williamson Sixth Floor, Lehmann Building, Peoria 2 

Term 1957-1963 

Earl M. Hughes Hughes Farms, Route 1, Woodstock 

Wayne A. Johnston 135 E. Eleventh Place, Chicago 5 

Timothy W. Swain 912 Central National Bank Building, Peoria 2 

Term 1959-1965 

Howard W. Clement 38 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago 3 

Richard A. Harewood 733 E. Seventy-fifth Street, Chicago 19 

Harold Pogue 705 N. Oakland Avenue, Decatur 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Kenney E. Williamson, President Peoria 

Anthony J. Janata, Secretary Urbana 

Herbert O. Farber, Comptroller Urbana 

Clarence W. Weldon, Treasurer Chicago 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

David Dodds Henry, Ph.D., LL.D., HH.D., Litt.D., L.H.D., D.Sc.Ed., Ped.D. 

President of the University 
Gordon N. Ray, Ph.D., Litt.D., Vice-President and Provost 
Herbert Otis Farber, A.M., C.P.A., Vice-President and Comptroller 
Anthony James Janata, A.B., Executive Assistant to the President 
Frederick Theodore Wall, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate College 
Fred Harold Turner, Ph.D., Dean of Students 
Charles Wilson Sanford, Ph.D., Dean of Admissions and Records 



THE FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Carl Alfred Brandly, D.V.M., M.S., Dean of the College; Professor of Veterinary 

Microbiology and Public Health 
Robert Graham, B.S., D.V.M., Dean of the College and Professor of Veterinary 

Pathology and Hygiene, Emeritus 
Joseph Ortan Alberts, V.M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene: Head of Department 
Thomas Robert Bonner Barr, M.R.C.V.S., M.V.Sc, Instructor in Veterinary 

Pathology and Hygiene 
John Conner Bartley, B.S., D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Physiology and 

Pharmacology 
Paul Donald Beamer, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Loyd Edwin Boley, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Clinical Medicine ; 

Head of Department 
Bruce Orr Brodie, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
Marion Emeline Compton, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Denzil Ellis Dees, M.S., D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Physiology and 

Pharmacology 
Deam Hunter Ferris, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Thomas Edward Fritz, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Christina Garwood, B.S., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Lyle Eugene Hanson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Pathology 

and Hygiene 
Harry Jr. Hardenbrook, D.V.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
Ray Davenport Hatch, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
Lloyd Champ Helper, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
Alvin Bernard Hoerlein, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Sohan Lai. Issar, M.S., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Virginia Ruth Ivens, B.S., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Merlin LeMoyne Kaeberi.e, D.V.M., M.S., Fellow in Veterinary Medical Science 
Julius Peter Kreier, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Marilyn Larson, A.B., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Norman Dion Levins, Ph.D., Professoi <>i Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Donald RoBERI LlNOARD, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Roger Paui Link, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor <>t Veterinary Physiology and 

IMi, H in. ii ologi 
Marjoru Elizabeth Losch, M.S., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
'.< i l»\ M. [nstructoi in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
a Malhotra, B.\ s . M.S.. Assist. int in Veterinary Physiology and 

l'h. ii iii.M ology 
John Patrick M l»\ M , M.S., [nstructoi in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 

i. Mansfield, lis. DAM, Associat< Profess I Veterinary 

nsion 



Krishna Xandan Mehra, M.S., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 

Ram Xarain Mohan, L.V.P., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 

Dl w Irwin Newton, DA.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Physiology and 

Pharmacology 
Richard Albert Xotzold, M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and Histology 
Raymond Edgar Olsen, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Thomas Neil Phillips, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
Jesse Ronald Pickard, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Extension 
Elwood Frank Reber, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Veterinary Physiology and 

Pharmacology 
Elizabeth Jeane Reeves, M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and Histology 
Harry Elmer Rhoades, M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Alvin Harold Safanie, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and 

Histology 
Lorenz Edward St. Clair, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Anatomy and 

Histology; Head of Department 
Jesse Sampson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Physiology and Pharma- 
cology; Head of Department 
Wilhelm Friedrich Schaeffler, D.V.M., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Alfred George Schiller, D.V.M., M.S., Associate Professor of Veterinary Clinical 

Medicine 
John Edward Schmidt, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and Histology 
Robert George Scholtens, D.V.M., Fellow in Veterinary Medical Science 
Robert Lee Schricker, D.V.M., M.S., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Erwin Small, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Clinical Medicine 
Ernest Victor Stromlund, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary Anatomy and 

Histology 
Joseph Szanto, D.V.M., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Richard Martin Thomas, D.V.M., M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Pathology and 

Hygiene 
Harry Everett Walburg, Jr., D.V.M., M.S., Fellow in Veterinary Medical Science 
Stanley Dean Warner, D.V.M., Assistant in Veterinary Pathology and Hygiene 
Adolf Michael Watrach, M.R.C.V.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 

Pathology and Hygiene 
George Theodore Woods, D.V.M., M.P.H., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 

Extension 

COOPERATING STAFF MEMBERS 

From the Library 

Marian Theresa Estep, A.M., Veterinary Medicine Librarian (with rank of 
Assistant Professor) 

From the State Department of Agriculture 

Patrick Carl Matchette, B.S., Chemist I 

David Daniel Myers, D.V.M., Animal Pathologist I 

Edwin Ivan Pilchard, Jr., D.V.M., Veterinarian III (Supervisor) 

Mrs. Marian Ann Watrach, M.S., Bacteriologist I 



CALENDAR 1959-1961 



1959 — FIRST SEMESTER 

Entrance examinations Sept. 8, Tues. ■ — Sept. 11, Fri. 

New student week and registration Sept. 14, Mon. — Sept. 19, Sat. 

Instruction begins . Sept. 21, Mon. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins Nov. 25, Wed., 1 p.m. 

Thanksgiving vacation ends Nov. 30, Mon., 1 p.m. 

Illinois Day (State admitted to the Union, 1818) Dec. 3, Thurs. 

Christmas vacation begins Dec. 19, Sat., 1 p.m. 

Christmas vacation ends Jan. 4, Mon., 1 p.m. 

Study Day (classes dismissed) Jan. 21, Thurs. 

Semester examinations Jan. 22, Fri. — Jan. 30, Sat. 

1960 — SECOND SEMESTER 

Entrance examinations Feb. 2, Tues. — Feb. 5, Fri. 

Registration Feb. 8, Mon. — Feb. 10, Wed. 

Instruction begins Feb. 11, Thurs. 

University Day (University opened, 1868) March 2, Wed. 

Spring vacation begins April 12, Tues., 1 p.m. 

Spring vacation ends April 18, Mon., 1 p.m. 

Honors Day (lasses dismissed at noon) April 29, Fri. 

Memorial Day (holiday) May 30, Mon. 

Study Day (lasses dismissed) May 30, Mon. 

Semestei examinations May 31, Tues.- — June 8, Wed. 

( ommencemenl exercises .!>"»<' 18, Sat. 

I960 — SUMMER SESSION 

Entrance examinations J un( ' 7, Tues. - June in. In. 

tration June 20, Mon. 

Instruction begins June 21, lues. 

Independence Da) (lasses dismissed July i, Mon. 

Summei session examinations Aug. 12, Fri. Aug. 13, Sat. 



1960 — FIRST SEMESTER 

Entrance examinations Sept. 6, Tues. — Sept. 9, Fri. 

New student week and registration Sept. 12, Mon. — Sept. 17, Sat. 

Instruction begins Sept. 19, Mon. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins Nov. 23, Wed., 1 p.m. 

Thanksgiving vacation ends Nov. 28, Mon., 8 a.m. 

Illinois Day (State admitted to the Union, 1818) Dec. 3, Sat. 

Christmas vacation begins Dec. 17, Sat., 1 p.m. 

Christmas vacation ends Jan. 3, Tues., 1 p.m. 

Study Day (classes dismissed) Jan. 19, Thurs. 

Semester examinations Jan. 20, Fri. — Jan. 28, Sat. 

1961 — SECOND SEMESTER 

Entrance examinations Jan. 31, Tues. — Feb. 3, Fri. 

Registration Feb. 6, Mon. — Feb. 8, Wed. 

Instruction begins Feb. 9, Thurs. 

University Day (University opened, 1868) March 2, Thurs. 

Spring vacation begins March 25, Sat., 1 p.m. 

Spring vacation ends April 3, Mon., 1 p.m. 

Honors Day (classes dismissed at noon) May 5, Fri. 

Memorial Day (holiday) May 30, Tues. 

Study Day (classes dismissed) May 30, Tues. 

Semester examinations May 31, Wed. — June 8, Thurs. 

Commencement exercises June 17, Sat. 

1961 — SUMMER SESSION 

Entrance examinations June 6, Tues. — June 9, Fri. 

Registration June 19, Mon. 

Instruction begins June 20, Tues. 

Independence Day (classes dismissed) July 4, Tues. 

Summer session examinations Aug. 11, Fri. — Aug. 12, Sat. 



COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

The College of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Illinois was 
established in 1944. A professional four-year course leading to the Doctor 
of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) degree was activated in 1948, and the 
first class of the College was graduated in 1952. During 1957, the College 
was advanced from an undergraduate to a professional status. 

Although one of the newer colleges of the University of Illinois, the 
College is not a newcomer from the standpoint of tradition. A course in 
veterinary science was taught at the University as early as 1870, three 
years after the institution was chartered as the Illinois Industrial Uni- 
versity. In 1899, a Department of Veterinary Science was established in 
the College of Agriculture. This department was replaced by the Division 
of Pathology and Hygiene in 1917. Two years later, a barn at the south 
end of the campus was remodeled and designated as the Animal Pa- 
thology Laboratory and Clinic Building. 

In 1927, a part-time program of extension teaching was formally 
organized and emphasis was placed on sanitation, herd and flock man- 
agement, laboratory aids in diagnosis, and the prevention and control of 
infectious abortion in cattle and swine. Four years later, the Illinois State 
Department of Agriculture began cooperating with the Division of Ani- 
mal Pathology and Hygiene on routine diagnostic work for the entire 
livestock industry of the state. A similar arrangement is now in effect 
between the State Department of Agriculture and the College of Vet- 
erinary Medicine. 

In 1940, the Division of Animal Pathology and Hygiene became a 
Department in the College of Agriculture. This unit was made one of 
the four departments of the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1944. 



ii 



OBJECTIVES 

A major objective of the College of Veterinary Medicine is to aid 
Illinois farmers in combating livestock diseases. The prevention and con- 
trol of diseases of all species of animals is, however, the responsibility and 
obligation of the College. This is accomplished, in part, by extensive 
training of qualified students in the art and practice of veterinary medi- 
cine. Another important objective is public health. A phase of public 
health work invokes suppressing diseases transmissible between animals 
and human beings. Three major activities — teaching, public service, 
and research — serve in the fulfillment of these objectives by the College. 

Teaching is of two kinds — resident and extension. Resident teaching 
is at the undergraduate, professional, and graduate levels. Extension 
teaching is carried on largely in rural communities but reaches into urban 
areas. It includes on-campus meetings, conferences, and special courses. 



CLASS IN VETERINARY ANATOMY 




The service program incorporates the important functions of disease 
detection and diagnosis. Many people take advantage of the services pro- 
vided by the large and small clinics, the diagnostic laboratory, and 
ambulatory service. Operation of these services also provides valuable 
teaching materials for students. 

Research toward better means and methods of overcoming the 
hazards and ravages of diseases is another important function of the Col- 
lege. Many of the College's research projects are concerned with danger- 
ous communicable diseases including studies on leptospirosis, tuberculosis, 
brucellosis, and rabies — diseases transmissible from animals to man. 
Metabolic and deficiency diseases require major investigations also. 

FACILITIES 

The College now occupies the veterinary medical basic sciences unit 
located on Pennsylvania Avenue. The four-story, modern, brick building, 
considered one of the finest of its type in the country, provides offices, 
laboratories, and classrooms essential for teaching and research. 

The veterinary medical students have access to the excellent Univer- 
sity library and to other college libraries on the campus in addition to 
their own library located on the second floor of the Veterinary Medicine 
Building. The veterinary medical library contains approximately seven 
thousand volumes covering the broad area which constitutes veterinary 
medicine and related subjects. 

A modern annex for diagnosis and research joins the main building. 

The Large Animal Clinic, a spacious unit of attractive design, is 
located on Maryland Avenue south of the basic science unit. Completed 
in October, 1955, it is designed to accommodate fifty large animal 
patients. Included in this building are modern surgery and X-ray facil- 
ities, pharmacy, recovery rooms, a room for spraying or dipping animals, 
and a feed-storage room. The west side opens into an enclosed service 
and exercise court. 

The Small Animal Clinic remains in the old Veterinary Clinic build- 
ing, located at Sixth Street and Taft Drive, until new small animal 
facilities are added. These facilities will join the Large Animal Clinic 
building. 

Much of the important research in veterinary medicine is conducted 
by the Department of Veterinary Research in the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. An eighty-acre farm on South Race Street, four miles from 
the College, provides extensive facilities for research with various diseases. 



13 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of two years of preveterinary medical instruction is re- 
quired for admission to the College. Preveterinary students may register 
in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Equivalent preveterinary 
instruction may be taken at other recognized institutions. Preveterinary 
medical training does not automatically guarantee admission to the Col- 
lege, however. 

Applicants for admission to the College must present not less than 
sixty semester hours of acceptable credit from a recognized college or 
university. Hours earned in military training or physical education are 
not counted in this total. The sixty semester hours must be distributed 
as follows: 

Hours 

Chemistry (including organic and quantitative analysis) 16 

Biological Science (botany and general zoology) 8 

Physics (including laboratory) 8 

Foreign Language 6 

English Composition and Rhetoric 6 

Electives in not less than two of the following fields: economics (including agricultural eco- 
nomics), fins arts, language, geography, history, literature, philosophy, political science, 
psychology, sociology, speech. Approximately one-half of these credits should be in 

the social sciences 9 

Free Electives 7 

Total 60 

Proficiency in the use of written English is required. Students who 
receive grades of C or D in Rhetoric 102 or its equivalent are required 
to pass an English qualifying examination. Those who fail to pass this 
examination are required to complete an extra semester course in 
rhetoric (Rhetoric 200). 

Limitation of enrollment of students in the professional curriculum 
is mandatory because of limited facilities. In selecting students for admis- 
sion, scholarship in preveterinary medical work and character references 
are considered. Aptitude testing, professional and other, together with 
.id interviews also serve in the careful screening of students. Prefer- 
- nee i- given to residents of Illinois and to Illinois service veterans. 

Applications lor admission to the school year which begins in Sep- 
tember should be submitted before March I. 

Furthei information regarding ;i(linission requirements may be ob- 
tained by writing to the Dean of Admissions and Records, LOOa Admin- 
istration Building, University of Illinois. I rbana, Illinois. 



M 



PREVETERINARY MEDICINE CURRICULUM 

Specific courses and hours listed apply to preveterinary medicine stu- 
dents attending the University of Illinois. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester 15 to 18 Hours Second Semester 16 to 19 Hours 

Rhetoric and Composition (Rhet. 101) 3 Rhetoric and Composition (Rhet. 102) 3 

General Zoology (Zool. 101) 5 General Botany (Bot. 100) 4 

General Chemistry (Chem. 101 or 102). . 5 or 3 Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative 

Trigonometry (Math. 114 or 104) 2 or 3 Analysis (Chem. 105) 5 

Military (men) 1 Military (men) 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

Electives 2 Electives 4 to 7 

SECOND YEAR 

First Semester 16 to 18 Hours Second Semester 16 to 18 Hours 

General Physics (Physics 101) 5 General Physics (Physics 102) 5 

Language 1 4 Language 1 4 

Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 122), or Organic Chemistry (Chem. 133), or 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 133) 5 Quantitative Analysis (Chem. 122) 5 

Military (men) 1 Military (men) 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

Electives 2 to 4 Electives 2 to 4 

1 The student's attention is called to the advantages of continuing with the same foreign language 
as was accepted for admission to the preveterinary curriculum. Four years of credit in lan- 
guages in high school are accepted as fulfilling the requirement for two semesters of language. 



THE CURRICULUM 

The first two years in the College of Veterinary Medicine are de- 
voted largely to basic professional subjects such as anatomy, biochemistry, 
physiology, bacteriology, pathology, parasitology, and pharmacology. 
These courses are the foundation for the applied work of the final two 
years. In addition to the basic courses, selected courses are required in 
animal science and dairy science. 

The third year represents a transitional stage in the training of the 
professional student. The courses are of semiapplied and applied nature 
and form a bridge between the fundamental work of the first two years 
and the clinical work of the fourth year. These courses include special 
pathology, pharmacology, general and special surgery, diseases of small 
animals, diseases of large animals, breeding problems and obstetrics, 
plant and other poisonings, and clinical and laboratory practice. 

In keeping with the modern trend in veterinary medical education, 
approximately two-thirds of the instruction in the fourth year is in 



15 



clinical and laboratory practice. This gives students full opportunity to 
apply knowledge gained in the classroom and laboratory to the diagnosis, 
treatment, and prevention of animal diseases. Courses in radiology, 
diseases of poultry, infectious diseases of large animals, food hygiene and 
public health, jurisprudence, business methods and ethics, and seminar 
complete the period of formal education. 

In the third and fourth years, the class is divided into groups which 
rotate through the various clinical services. Each year the senior class 
spends two days at the Dixon Springs Agricultural Experiment Station 
at Robbs, Illinois, where the students participate in the fall round-up 
and gain valuable experience in the handling and treating of range 
cattle. During the spring semester, seniors take field trips to selected 
packing and food processing plants in the Chicago and other areas. They 
also have opportunity for practical observations and contact with public 
health agencies and their activities; also with zoological gardens and 
animal colonies for research. 

Graduating seniors may apply for commissions in the Veterinary 
Reserve Corps of the Army or Air Force, as well as in the United States 
Public Health Service. 



DISCUSSION OF A COMPLICATED DISLOCATION IN A SETTER DOG 




VETERINARY MEDICINE CURRICULUM 

F| RST YEAR Credit c|Qck 

First Semester Hours Hours 

An. Sci. 102 — Principles of Feeding 3 4 

Chem. 354 — Biochemistry 5 9 

V.A. 311 — Gross Anatomy 5 12 

V.A. 313 — Histology and Embry- 
ology 5 10 

V.P.H. 319 — Veterinary History 

and Orientation 1 1 

Total 19 36 

SECOND YEAR 
First Semester 

An. Sci. 103 — Breeds and Market 

Classes of Livestock 3 5 

V.P.H. 323 — Bacteriology and 

Immunology 5 9 

V.P.H. 324 — Parasitology 4 4 

V.P.H. 327— Parasitology 2 6 

V.P.P. 321— Physiology 4 8 

Total 18 32 

THIRD YEAR 
First Semester 

V.A. 315 — Applied Anatomy 1 2 

V.C.M. 331— Diseases of Small 

Animals 5 5 

V.C.M. 335 — General Surgery. . . 3 5 

V.C.M. 337 — Clinical and Labora- 
tory Practice 2 6 

V.P.H. 326— Special Pathology. . . 5 9 

V.P.H. 339— Clinical Pathology . . 2 4 

V.P.P. 330 — Pharmacology 3 4 

Total 21 35 

FOURTH YEAR 
First Semester 

V.C.M. 341 — Infectious Diseases of 

Large Animals 5 5 

V.C.M. 343— Radiology 2 2 

V.C.M. 345— Seminar 1 1 

V.C.M. 347 — Clinical and Labora- 
tory Practice 8 28 

V.P.H. 349— Diseases of Poultry . 3 3 

Total 19 39 



Credit Clock 
Second Semester Hours Hours 

An. Nutr. 351 — Principles of 

Nutrition 3 3 

Bact. 300 — General Microbiology 5 9 

D.S. 100 — Introduction to Dairy 

Production 3 4 

V.A. 312 — Gross Anatomy 5 12 

V.A. 314— Histology and Embry- 
ology 5 10 

Total 21 38 

Second Semester 

An. Sci. 110 — Plant and Animal 

Genetics 3 4 

An. Sci. 304 — Poultry Manage- 
ment 4 5 

V.P.H. 325— General Pathology.. 5 9 

V.P.P. 322— Physiology 4 8 

V.P.P. 329 — Pharmacology 4 5 

Total 20 31 

Second Semester 

Bot. 226 — Poisonous Plants 2 4 

V.C.M. 333 — Breeding Problems 

and Obstetrics 5 7 

V.C.M. 334 — Diseases of Large 

Animals 5 5 

V.C.M. 336 — Special Surgery. ... 5 10 

V.C.M. 338 — Clinical and Labora- 
tory Practice 2 6 

V.P.H. 332 — Principles of Sanita- 
tion in the Processing and Han- 
dling of Foods 2 4 

Total 21 36 

Second Semester 

Accy. 203 — Business and Account- 
ing Methods 2 2 

V.C.M. 340 — Jurisprudence and 

Ethics 2 2 

V.C.M. 346— Seminar 1 1 

V.C.M. 348 — Clinical and Labora- 
tory Practice 8 26 

V.P.H. 344 — Food Hygiene and 

Public Health 5 8 

Total 18 39 



17 







GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have passed all courses in the first two years of the 
veterinary medical curriculum and who have an average of 3.0 or better 
in these courses are eligible for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Veterinary Medicine. 

Students who have passed all courses in the veterinary medical cur- 
riculum and who have an average of 3.0 or better in these courses are 
eligible for the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

A program of graduate study leading to advanced degrees — Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy — in Veterinary Medical Science is 
offered. Students may specialize in any of the subject areas of the College. 
Research programs are both fundamental and applied. The major objec- 
tive of graduate study is to qualify the student for veterinary medical 
W li. teaching, and clinical specialities. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Grade designations are A. 11. C, I), and E. I) is the lowest passing 
grade and E is failure. The computation of individual averages is as 
follows: A ~> points; B I: C 3; I) = 2; and E = 1. The < redil 
points foi .i course are computed 1>\ multiplying the (ted it hours by the 
i redil points of the letter grade. 



18 



TUITION AND FEES 

There are certain fixed expenses that each student should be prepared 
to meet. The list below covers fixed fees and expenses for two semesters: 

Tuition — Illinois residents $150.00 

Nonresidents 500.00 

Laboratory, library, and supply fee 22.00 

Hospital-medical-surgical insurance fee 14.00 

Illini Union service charge 14.00 

Textbooks (approximate) 75.00 

Supplies (approximate) 35.00 

Total — Illinois residents $310.00 

Nonresidents 670.00 

Students are not required to purchase microscopes. 

Room and board costs vary from $640 to $820 yearly, depending on 
the accommodations. University-owned residence halls provide both 
room and board. A list of approved houses is available at the office of the 
off-campus housing supervisor, located in Illini Hall (see page 21 for 
further information) . 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Students in the College of Veterinary Medicine compete with other 
University students for University honors and scholarships. In addition, 
there are several scholarships exclusively for veterinary medical students, 
including the following: 

Dr. H. Preston Hoskins Scholarship. This scholarship is given an- 
nually to the student editor for the coming year. Sponsoring organizations 
are the Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association and the Chicago 
Veterinary Medical Association. 

Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association Scholarship Award. 
Fifty dollars is given to the senior student with the highest scholastic 
average for the four-year professional course. 

PRIZES 

A number of prizes, including those listed below, are available to 
stimulate initiative and offer financial reward to deserving College of 
Veterinary Medicine students. Not all these prizes are awarded each year. 

Women's Auxiliary of the American Veterinary Medical Association 



i? 



Award. Fifty dollars is presented to the student doing the most to ad- 
vance the standing of the veterinary profession on campus. 

Dr. Lester E. Fisher Award. Fifty dollars is given for proficiency in 
small animal clinical work. 

Arthur D. Goldhaft Poultry Award. Fifty dollars is awarded by the 
Vineland Poultry Laboratories to the senior student who writes the best 
essay on poultry disease problems. 

Illinois Veterinary Alumni Association Award. Twenty-five dollars is 
presented for proficiency in clinical medicine. 

Moss Essay Contest. The winner of first place in this contest receives 
$25: second place, $15; and third place, $10. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

Certain loan funds have been established to aid University students. 
These funds are available to students in the College of Veterinary Medi- 
cine. Usually loans are not made to students in their first year at the 
University. 

The Women's Auxiliary- of the American Veterinary Medical Asso- 
ciation has a loan fund for worthy students in Veterinary Medicine. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The Health Service of the University provides routine clinical, labora- 
tory, and X-ray services for all students. Consultation is available on 
personal matters of a medical nature and on dental and psychiatric 
problems. 

In addition, students are eligible for admission and may receive scrv- 
u • s .is outpatients at McKinley Hospital, which operates on campus 
under the Health Service. Hospitalization for students is covered by stu- 
dent insurance. A Health Service physician is in residence at the hospital 
after the regular hours of the Health Center. He provides emergency 
service and admits patients to the hospital if they have not been seen 
by a private physician prior to admission. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Many students work part-time while attending school. Because of the 
largt riumbei oi classroom hours required oi veterinary students, how- 
<mi. it js recommended thai outside work be kept at a minimum. 

At present, a few veterinary medical students are employed on the 



20 



research Farm as animal caretakers and as laboratory assistants in other 
University departments. Such work offers both income and valuable 
experience to the prospective veterinarian. Other veterinary students are 
employed in board or board-and-room jobs. The student employment 
office, a division of the Dean of Students' office, provides information and 
assistance to the student who needs part-time work. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

The Housing Division provides current information on all types of 
accommodations for undergraduate, graduate, married, and single stu- 
dents. It issues application forms for space in University-operated resi- 
dence halls, provides lists of rooms available in other approved residences, 
and supervises standards of safety, health, comfort, and study conditions 
in housing units in which undergraduate and professional men and 
women live. 

Students are requested to contact the Housing Division by mail or 
in person immediately after applying for admission to the University. 
They will then receive copies of the Handbook of Student Housing, lists 
of current vacancies, area maps, etc., and will be given definite instruc- 
tions on how to apply for space in the particular type units in which they 
are interested and which will best serve their individual needs. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

Students in Veterinary Medicine center their activities around the 
student chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Similar 
organizations, all sponsored by the A.V.M.A., are found at all recognized 
veterinary schools and colleges in the United States and Canada. Faculty 
and student representatives from each student chapter meet annually at 
the national convention of the Association to discuss common problems. 

Activities of the student chapter at Illinois include social gatherings 
such as the annual freshman welcome, alumni dance, student-staff spring 
picnic and spring dinner-dance. Guest speakers on many phases of vet- 
erinary medicine and other subjects appear on semi-monthly programs. 
The chapter sponsors intramural athletic teams such as basketball, foot- 
ball, softball, and bowling. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Graduates of the College have formed the University of Illinois Vet- 
erinary Medical Alumni Association. The Association is designed to 
create broader professional acquaintances among the members, to provide 



21 



an opportunity for greater professional knowledge, to maintain contact 
with the College, and to assist the faculty and student body. 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE STUDENT CHAPTER 

OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

The Auxiliary of the Illinois student chapter is open to wives of vet- 
erinary medical students. The auxiliary meets monthly in the auditorium 
of the Veterinary Medicine Building to hear guest speakers on topics 
related to the veterinary medical profession as well as other topics. One 
member is offered the opportunity of attending the annual meeting of 
the A.V.M.A., and the following semester, reports on the activities of 
sister auxiliaries. Also, the group sponsors other social events such as 
wives' banquet for husbands, a farewell party for wives, and other 
activities. 

RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Athletic facilities at the University include Memorial Stadium, which 
seats 71,000 and serves for football games and track meets. The George 
Huff Gymnasium is used for basketball and other University functions. 
The Armory, with its cinder track and nets suspended from ceiling, per- 
mits indoor track meets and early-season indoor baseball practice. Illinois 
Field has freshman and varsity baseball diamonds, a quarter-mile track, 
and tennis courts. The Ice Skating Rink is used for recreational skating 
and physical education classes. 

The Illini Union student activities organization is in charge of 
many activities in the Illini Union Building and all campus activities at 
Urbana-Champaign, such as Homecoming, Dad's Day, Mother's Day, 
etc. The Illini Union Building has lounges, food services, meeting and 
game rooms, browsing library, ticket sales and information desks, and 
other services. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR VETERINARIANS 

A wide horizon awaits graduates in veterinary medicine. Although 
60 per cenl of all veterinarians are engaged in some kind of practice, 
there arc also 1>o>.hI opportunities in the public service, teaching and 
researchj publi< health, national, state, and local regulatory and inspec- 
tion activities, food sanitation and related activities. There are increas- 
ing needs and opportunities lor graduate veterinarians interested in 
tea< Inn", in* hiding extension and research, as a career. The commercial 

world needs veterinary medical skill in the production of biological and 



?? 




LARGE ANIMAL CLINIC 



pharmaceutical products, in the promotion and sale of such products, 
and in field service work. 

The United States Department of Agriculture maintains a full- 
time staff of about 1,500 veterinarians whose principal assignments con- 
sist of inspecting meat in federally inspected packing plants and port, 
and field work in animal disease detection, suppression, and eradication. 
By inspecting animals before, at the time of, and after slaughter, as well 
as during processing operations, veterinarians detect and bar from public 
channels unsafe meat and meat products. 

Other opportunities in the Department of Agriculture include stock- 
yards supervision, poultry inspection, enforcement of import and export 
regulations, research work on animal health problems, and licensing 
supervision over the manufacture of serums and vaccines for animals. 

The Army and Air Force also require a substantial number of 
veterinarians for the inspection of foods, especially meat and dairy 
products, to prevent unwholesome or poor-quality foods from being 
served to troops; and for diagnosis and research. Other agencies that 
employ veterinarians are the United States Public Health Service and 
the Food and Drug Administration. United States veterinarians also 
serve with international agencies such as the World Health Organization 
and the Pan-American Sanitary Bureau. 

Many states and municipalities employ veterinarians for disease con- 
trol and eradication work. They cooperate with federal and local veter- 
inarians, private practitioners, and public health veterinarians in testing 
cattle, inspecting sanitary conditions in packing houses, and in inspect- 
ing meat, milk, and other animal food products. 



23 



Rapid developments in the nuclear sciences with problems arising 
from possible widespread contamination by radio-active fallouts have 
alerted the public to the need for more attention to veterinary medical 
aspects of this danger, namely, the exposure of food-producing animals. 
Veterinarians will be concerned with ways to protect the health of these 
animals and thus provide a safeguard for this important source of food 
for our growing population. 

Other opportunities of a more limited nature include work in zoos 
and public parks, racing stables, animal colonies for medical and veter- 
inary medical research, fur farming, circuses, on cattle ranches, and 
with humane societies. 



24 



COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

1956-1959 DR. FRANK F. ADAMS, MT. CARMEL 

1957-1959 DR. W. J. ANGERER, ATKINSON 

1957-1959 DR. PAUL GAMBREL, WINNEBAGO 

1957-1960 DR. CECIL A. KRAKOWER, OAK PARK 

1956-1959 DR. CLIFFORD A. LEMEN, WARRENSBURG 

1957-1960 DR. E. E. LUTZ, CHAMPAIGN 

1958-1960 MR. RUSSELL V. McKEE, WASHBURN 

1957-1960 DR. C. M. RODGERS, BLANDINSVILLE 
1957-1960 MR. STILLMAN J. STANARD, SPRINGFIELD 

1957-1959 MR. ALBERT WEBB, EWING 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



3 0112 110343487